Calibration Wafer Standard

Calibration Wafer Standards are produced with polystyrene latex spheres and polystyrene latex beads, which are NIST Traceable, particle size standards.

Calibration Wafer Standards are produced with polystyrene latex spheres, deposited over the wafer surface as a full deposition across the wafer or as multiple spot depositions around the wafer. The particle size standards are NIST Traceable and the Size Certificate of the Calibration Wafer Standard is based on that NIST Traceability. Polystyrene latex beads are deposited on the wafer surface, each size with a monodisperse size peak. The sizes deposited are available between 40nm and 12 microns. The resulting PSL Wafer Standard is used to calibrate the size response curves of Tencor Surfscan 6220 and 6440 wafer inspection systems; as well as KLA-Tencor Surfscan SP1, SP2, SP3, SP5 and SP5xp wafer inspection systems. Full Deposition is where the polystyrene latex particles with a single, narrow size peak are deposited uniformly across the full surface of the wafer. Spot Deposition means the polystyrene latex beads are deposited as a single, narrow size peak, but deposited as a small spot at one location on the wafer; or deposited as multiple sizes around the wafer.

 

Calibration Wafer Standard – Request a Quote

Applied Physics produces Calibration Wafer Standards to your specifications:

Wafer Size:           100mm, 125mm, 150mm, 200mm or 300mm

Type Deposition:  FULL Deposition or SPOT Deposition

Wafer Surface:     Prime Silicon, Customer Si Wafer, Customer Glass Wafer, Customer Bare Mask

Particle Count:     count is approximate and depends on size of wafer, count is typically between 2500 and 20000 count, as measured by our wafer inspection system

Certification:        NIST Traceable

Wafer Inspection Systems, now called a surface scanning Inspection System (SSIS), are used to scan non-patterned wafers during device manufacture, so as to monitor the cleanliness of the starting wafers prior to device manufacture. The SSIS tool uses a laser beam to scan across the wafer surface. The laser beam width limits the particle size resolution. For example, if the beam width is 1 micron wide, then a particle smaller than 1 micron in diameter would be hard to size. The basic particle detection concept of the SSIS tool uses an overlapping scan to layout a scan map, which then locates the detected particles on a scan map, assigned in particle size and X/Y location on the wafer surface. As the laser scans across the wafer, when a particle is detected, the particle emits a light signature, which is detected by a solid state diode (SSD).  The laser beam power, beam width and uniformity of power across the laser beam width are all elements, which control the wafer inspection systems accuracy in correctly sizing surface particles. In addition, the Solid State Detector or photo multiplier tube detector affects particle sizing.

The primary purpose of a Calibration Wafer Standard is to calibrate an SSIS tool with NIST traceable size standards, calibrated across the size range of the SSIS tool. SSIS tools today typically offer 40nm minimum size detection. This would be KLA-Tencor SP3 and SP5 tools, and some of these tools are now under 20nm particle size detection. Older SSIS tools, such as KLA-Tencor SP1 and SP2 detect at 85nm and above. The older Tencor 6200, Tencor 6220, Tencor 6400 and Tencor 6420 are typically able to detect around 150nm and above.

Each one of these tools may use 3 to 8 different calibration wafer standards that help to calibrate size accuracy at the minimum particle sensitivity, maximum particle sensitivity and a number of calibration points between the min and max points, forming a calibration curve for that wafer inspection tool. Once calibrated the SSIS tool is then able to respond consistently to different particles detected on non-patterned wafers.

Calibration Wafer Standard, Full Deposition, 5um – Calibration Wafer Standard, Spot Deposition, 100nm

Calibration Wafer Standard – Request a Quote

Applied Physics produces Calibration Wafer Standards to your specifications:

Wafer Size:           100mm, 125mm, 150mm, 200mm or 300mm

Type Deposition:  FULL Deposition or SPOT Deposition

Wafer Surface:     Prime Silicon, Customer Si Wafer, Customer Glass Wafer, Customer Bare Mask

Particle Count:     count is approximate and depends on size of wafer, count is typically between 2500 and 20000 count, as measured by our wafer inspection system

Certification:        NIST Traceable

Wafer Inspection Systems, now called a surface scanning Inspection System (SSIS), are used to scan non-patterned wafers during device manufacture, so as to monitor the cleanliness of the starting wafers prior to device manufacture. The SSIS tool uses a laser beam to scan across the wafer surface. The laser beam width limits the particle size resolution. For example, if the beam width is 1 micron wide, then a particle smaller than 1 micron in diameter would be hard to size. The basic particle detection concept of the SSIS tool uses an overlapping scan to layout a scan map, which then locates the detected particles on a scan map, assigned in particle size and X/Y location on the wafer surface. As the laser scans across the wafer, when a particle is detected, the particle emits a light signature, which is detected by a solid state diode (SSD).  The laser beam power, beam width and uniformity of power across the laser beam width are all elements, which control the wafer inspection systems accuracy in correctly sizing surface particles. In addition, the Solid State Detector or photo multiplier tube detector affects particle sizing.

The primary purpose of a Calibration Wafer Standard is to calibrate an SSIS tool with NIST traceable size standards, calibrated across the size range of the SSIS tool. SSIS tools today typically offer 40nm minimum size detection. This would be KLA-Tencor SP3 and SP5 tools, and some of these tools are now under 20nm particle size detection. Older SSIS tools, such as KLA-Tencor SP1 and SP2 detect at 85nm and above. The older Tencor 6200, Tencor 6220, Tencor 6400 and Tencor 6420 are typically able to detect around 150nm and above.

Each one of these tools may use 3 to 8 different calibration wafer standards that help to calibrate size accuracy at the minimum particle sensitivity, maximum particle sensitivity and a number of calibration points between the min and max points, forming a calibration curve for that wafer inspection tool. Once calibrated the SSIS tool is then able to respond consistently to different particles detected on non-patterned wafers.

Calibration Wafer Standard, Full Deposition, 5um – Calibration Wafer Standard, Spot Deposition, 100nm